Great Photography Books for your Snapper

December 16, 2009  •  Leave a Comment
Category:Photographers who committed suicideLarge_format_camera_lens

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By Alex Thorne

The simple truth is that better equipment doesn’t make you a better photographer. Creativity, and understanding how to use your camera to get the affect you’re trying to achieve, are paramount to your success. Classes can be expensive and time-consuming for most folks. And, although digital technology gives you immediate results that you can review to adjust your technique, teaching yourself can still be a frustrating experience. Simply put, invest a few dollars in one or two photography books in order to take full advantage of the large investment you’ve made in equipment.

The New York Times recently published an article titled, “Three Photography Books for Gift-Giving,” that aspiring shutterbugs should check out. Many of the techniques I use have been influenced by reading instruction books by master photographers, and I highly recommend that folks new to the hobby use them to get up-to-speed quickly. Learning just a few creative techniques can really make a difference in your final product and add to your picture taking enjoyment. Otherwise, you may never fully appreciate what your camera can do for you.

From The New York Times: Three Photography Books for Gift-Giving

There are plenty of useful Web sites that help aspiring photographers sharpen their digital photography skills. But, as heretical as this may sound, sometimes you just want a book. A printed book, one with handsomely produced photos that demonstrate photography at its best.

Over the last month I have looked at books on digital photography and found some that would make great holiday gifts (for those of you who can’t afford that fast prime lens for the snapper on your list). Two of the three books I have selected are instructive guides that target digital photography novices, although they also offer some great insights for those who have used a camera for years. The third book targets young photogs with any kind of camera and an active sense of creativity.

Read more of The New York Times article–>>


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